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5 Real Haunted Places In NJ

New Jersey has many stories to tell and some of them significantly blur the line between the natural and the supernatural. Real haunted places in NJ do exist, and for the brave and adventurous, these serve as beacons for discovery and exploration. Here are five of the most notable hauntings in the Garden State:

5 Real Haunted Places in NJ

Clinton Road

This long, lonely, curvy stretch of asphalt is not the best place to be at night. At 10 miles long, the road is eerie and mostly quiet, and has been reported to display hauntings that run the gamut from ghosts to witches to mysterious writings and strange sounds. The most popular stretch of the road can be found at the Dead Man’s Curve bridge. It is believed to be haunted by the ghost of a little boy who could be summoned by tossing coins down the stream below. The boy then throws the coins back to their owner. If you find yourself driving along Clinton Road, locals recommended that you never get out of the car.

Clinton Road

Wikipedia/Daniel Case 

The Proprietary House

Located in Perth Amboy and built in 1764, the Proprietary House was once the home of New Jersey’s Royal Governor and was even turned into a hotel in the early 1800s. Part of this old mansion is now a museum that is open for public tours twice a week. It does lead a double life, however. It is rumored to be haunted by ghosts, the most notable of which are those of a young boy, a woman in a white dress and a soldier from the Revolutionary War. In 2008, the house was featured on SyFy’s “Ghost Hunters”.

ProprietaryHousePerthAmboy

Wikipedia/Rafaelgarcia

The Pine Barrens

The Pine Barrens consists of more than 1 million acres of woodland that is also home to ruins of mining and mill settlements. Although scenic with lovely hidden spots scattered throughout the reserve, it is also rumored to be the home of the Jersey Devil – believed to be Satan’s spawn with a human woman. It once caused hysteria in 1909 and a bounty of $10,000 was even put up for anyone brave enough to bring back the devil’s head.

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Pine Barrens

Flickr/Matt Swern

And then, there are the ghosts – the most famous of which is that of a young boy, presumably a hit-and-run victim. The boy only appears at night at Burnt Mill Road, running after his ball. Another ghostly apparition is that of James Still. He was an African-American doctor believed to have been lynched for practicing his profession but he seems to have harbored no ill will. His ghost is rumored to be helpful, particularly to people who are injured or find themselves lost.

Shades of Death Road

How this haunted road got its name is debatable but most people who live in the area swear that this is one of the most notorious real haunted places in NJ. Dark and lonely at night, and lined with trees, this road was a mute witness to an outbreak of malaria in 1849 which caused a number of deaths. Fatalities from murders and robberies are believed to cause the hauntings along the road and it doesn’t help that it runs past the lovely but eerie Ghost Lake, said to be home to several ghostly apparitions.

Shades of Death Road Street Sign

Wikipedia/Daniel Case 

The Devil’s Tree

The Devil’s Tree is actually an oak tree, standing alone in a field on Somerset County’s Mountain Road. Various legends surround the tree, with some claiming it is cursed because of the deaths that are associated with it. It is believed to have been used by a local farmer who, after killing his family, hung himself on one of its limbs. It is also said to have been used by the Ku Klux Klan to hang African-Americans. Showing disrespect to the tree is discouraged because people who have done so were supposed to have met a violent end. When touched, the tree is rumored to feel warm and no snow gathers on the ground under it.

The Devils Tree

Wikipedia/DanielCaseWikipedia/DanielCase

How many of these real haunted places in NJ have you visited? Do you know of any others that should be added to the list?

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About the author

Diane Nassy

Diane is a New Jersey-based writer and blogger. She is a wife and the mom of a 9-year-old little boy. Through her blog, she wants to inspire moms to find Zen in their lives while offering practical tips and other valuable information to help families deal with everyday issues. Check out Diane's Google+ profile "